NEW MIX! CASH MONEY BOUNCE

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I finally finished a mix that I’ve been working on little by little over the last year, exclusively after 2am. Blame the stupid working hours on the fun of becoming a dad – each night I was volunteering to stay up all night to look after my son’s night feeds and would spend my new nocturnal spare time answering questions like “I wonder how many gigabytes the entire No Limit discography will take up on my laptop” (the answer is 12.17). I became addicted to staying up late and delving deep into the back catalogues of my favourite artists, producers and record labels; my downloading marathons interrupted by the cries of a hungry baby, who would be fed with one as I spent way too much money on the eBay app with the other, bidding on old tapes and CDs with a recklessness not usually associated with new parents.

A mission I accepted early into my night rap crusade was to fill the gaps in my Cash Money discography. Cash Money has always been the label I’m quick to blurt out whenever someone asks what my favourite rap label is – but it’s always immediately followed by “until 2005!”. That’s the year Mannie Fresh left the label, the best rap producer of all time and the heart and soul of Cash Money during their best years. It was crazy to me how different the early Cash Money releases were to what they put out these days and I wanted to hear the progression of Mannie Fresh as a producer, of Cash Money as a label and of Cash Money’s influenceon the sound of New Orleans hip hop. I’d become fascinated with the history of New Orleans rap scene in the 90s (spending as much money on old No Limit albums and the odd overpriced bounce 12″ as I was on Cash Money releases) so I bought a few books documenting the bounce movement, most of which were useless and referenced the articles I was finding online anyway (Matt Miller’s Bounce is a great read though). For the purpose of this mix, the best article I found was this fantastic history of Cash Money’s independent years on the Amoeba Records blog, which the perfect introduction to the labels beginnings and the characters involved in their long story. (Sidenote: last year I found Lil Wayne’s 500 Degreez on vinyl at Amoeba Records in LA for $1 but I’d parked illegally in the Jack In A Box across the road. My car was towed and I had to pay $250 to get it released. Bargain!)

A weeks worth of Paypal transactions and illegal downloads of hard to find tape rips was all it took to complete my collection and soon my iTunes library contained every single record released on Cash Money from 1992 until 2004 (even the Teena Marie album). As my son slept, I immersed myself in the back catalogue, burning dozens of comps of my favourite tracks for the car and whittling it down to the essentials. I was immediately drawn to the bounce stuff as that’s where Mannie Fresh’s roots with Cash Money are. The beats on the first few releases are rawww (especially when heard as a low quality mp3 ripped from a cassette), with fairly primitive drum machine loops and recognisable samples. With each release Mannie builds on the bounce framework more and more, adding live instrumentation and relying less on loops, eventually removing the tell-tale bounce samples and producing his more hip hoppy (but still clearly bounce influenced) signature sound.

Originally this mix was gonna just collect the bounce tracks produced while Cash Money was an independent label (until 1998) but it made sense to include the last two proper bounce tracks Fresh produced, the mega hits ‘Back That Azz Up’ (from Juvenile’s 400 Degreez) and ‘I Need a Hot Girl’ (off the Hot Boys’ Guerilla Warfare) to show how he brought the sound of New Orleans bounce into the mainstream rap charts. Plus, they’re fucking awesome songs.

At some point I’ll make a mix of all of the more straight rap stuff Cash Money put out, from the Pimp C produced Kilo G tracks, to seriously half the songs on B.G.’s two part album It’s All On U. Even if I stuck to the independent years there’s enough gold to warrant another two mixes, showcasing one of the best labels and eras in the history of raps. Until then, here’s Cash Money Bounce.

Tracklist:

LIL’ SLIM bounce slide ride
B-32 shake that ass like a salt shaker
MC HEAVY gangster walk
PIMP DADDY got 2 be real (remix)
PxMxWx mo bounce
U.N.L.V. get into it with a nigger
U.N.L.V. eddie bow
PxMxWx still smokin’
PxMxWx splift out
PIMP DADDY keep on kick it
B.G.’z true story
B-32 feat MS. TEE i need a bag of dope
U.N.L.V. 6th & baronne
PIMP DADDY god bless the dead (rip)
LIL’ SLIM feat PxMxWx blunt after blunt
LIL’ SLIM feat B-32 ho’s i used 2 sweat II
PxMxWx feat LIL’ SLIM big man got hoes
U.N.L.V. pussy c’mon to me!
MS. TEE let’s get high
U.N.L.V. jazzy bitch
MAGNOLIA SHORTY monkey on tha dick
JUVENILE feat BIG TYMERS & MAGNOLIA SHORTY 3rd ward soulja
MS. TEE i like it (MANNIE FRESH style)
JUVENILE feat LIL’ WAYNE & MANNIE FRESH back that azz up
HOT BOYS feat BIG TYMERS i need a hot girl

crooks

I’ll be playing a shitload of bounce hits this Saturday night in Sydney at Goodgod Small Club for Halfway Crooks. It’s Mardi Gras night and every year we do a New Orleans Mardi Gras Party which is always my favourite party of the year. Huge lineup, free beads and a solid three hours of triggaman samples. Come dance. RSVP here.

Artwork by Daniel McKinley.

ALL CAKE EVERYTHING


 

Good pal Sampology promised me he’d make a video to my stupid edit of the dumbest Jay-Z verse of all time. A few months passed and Sam came good on his promise.

This video is truly wonderful and in three days it’s gotten more than 16,000 views. Hopefully Jay-Z records more songs about pastries this year!

WRECENT WRITINGS

A recipe I wrote for Sopaipillas with Fried Chicken got put up on the Thump website with a cute lil’ interview.

I submitted some of my favourite take out spots in Sydney for this tasty article on YOLO.

I made a playlist of my favourite Waka Flocka Flame songs just in time for him to cancel (“postpone”) his Australian tour.

Cool!

I GAVE A TED TALK

Earlier in the year I was asked to give a talk at a Tedx event at the Northern Sydney Institute. Without hesitating (also without having ever watched a Ted Talk in my life) I said yes, opting to speak about the music workshops we run with Heaps Decent and the lessons young kids can learn through hip hop. Basically I wanted to focus on all the positives that can come out of using rap as a teaching tool.

I spoke about using rap to improve reading and writing skills through repetition, this was brought to my attention last year by a friend and speech pathologist Georgina Smith, who was in Wilcannia at the same time as us in 2012, running workshops at the Central School. She forwarded some relevant essays my way, in particular this one which I referenced a few times in my talk. 

I love rap and so does almost every kid in high school and primary school. It seems to be a taboo in most schools, a bad influence that parents and teachers refuse to understand. We get incredible results using rap in our Heaps Decent workshops, from the short term bursts of confidence and teamwork to the long term improvement of reading and writing skills.

The Ted Talk was a great opportunity to focus on the educational side of Heaps Decent (and rap music!) and find case studies that backed up our personal experiences working with young people. I’m keen to explore this further and hopefully give more talks on the subject. Hopefully I can encourage teachers to further their knowledge of rap instead of ignoring it completely! 

If you want to find out more about Heaps Decent head to our website. To speak with me further about using rap in the classroom – or maybe even Heaps Decent coming to your classroom – email me! Levins at heaps decent dot com.

Thanks to everyone at Tedx and the Northern Sydney Institute for giving me the opportunity to talk at length about something I love in front of a room full of people. I hope the video finds its way to the computer screen of someone who can gain something from it.

HALFWAY CROOKS THIS WEEKEND

Halfway Crooks, my rap party with Franco and Elston, is back on this weekend! Did you see the article I wrote for Oyster last month with my top 10 tracks from the first 4 years of Crooks? It’s a good one!

Franco has made an awesome mix for you to get familiar with before tomorrow – the final in his Lush Lyfe mix series – THE FINAL WAVE. Listen and download below!

NEW MIX: 2 MILLION IQ

Good news! I made a sequel to my WILDLY SUCCESSFUL 1 Million IQ mix from earlier in the  year. It features almost 20 triumphant jams that have been proven to increase your IQ in a very cool way. It’s called 2 MILLION IQ. Thanks to Bobby Gelato for doing that art and of course to Wavey Davey B for them drops.

DOWNLOAD 2 MILLION IQ HERE

STREAM 2 MILLION IQ HERE

TRACKLIST

WAVEY DAVEY B INTRO

RICH KIDZ popping shit 2

SEQUENCE feat QUEZ thinking of you

RICH KIDZ feat YUNG BOOKE i know ya

ROSCOE DASH hard work 

PRINCE CY HI go outside

FUTURE double cups and molly

SOULJA BOY feat KWONY CASH and J MONEY zan with that lean

ONE CHANCE cowabunga

F.L.Y. feat BAND GEAKZ party time

TRAVIS PORTER party time

YOUNG THUG thinkin’ out loud

RICH KIDZ nun else 2 do

K CAMP she got it

SOULJA BOY for my money

KWONY CASH thinking

YOUNG THUG feat HELLACOPTA foreign

TROUBLE molly world

WAVEY DAVEY B OUTRO

DOWNLOAD / STREAM

Check out 1 Million IQ!

NEW MIX: END OF THE NIGHT – THE RAP ONE

So I made a new mix of rap songs just in time for Halfway Crooks this weekend.

It’s the first in a series I’m gonna do featuring songs that I like to play at the end of the night. I mean I like to play most of these songs at the beginning and middle of the night too but these songs in particular are ones that I’ve ended a few parties with over the years – or continued the party with at a kick on!

Some of these songs are old, some are new, some of them are a little obscure and others were big hits. They’re all Southern rap songs either based around a soul sample or with a sing song hook. All the songs are pretty anthemic, even to a dude like me on the other side of the world from where these songs were made.

End Of The Night – The Rap One

Tracklist

GANGSTA BOO, PB, PLAYA FLY & BUN B sippin & spinnin (DIRTY DOCJAM remix)

OUTKAST feat SLEEPY BROWN elevators (me and you)

BIG MIKE world of mine

SOULJA SLIM love me or love me not

UGK use me up

THREE 6 MAFIA feat REMY MA pussy got ya hooked

MAC feat SILKK THE SHOCKER & FIEND be all you can be

OUTKAST spottieottiedopaliscious

DIAMOND & PRINCESS georgia girls

LUDACRIS feat FIELD MOB & JAMIE FOXX georgia

GETO BOYS six feet deep

UGK one day

HOOD HEADLINAZ soul glo

TYTE WURK mary jane

DEVIN THE DUDE doobie ashtray

DEVIN THE DUDE stray

Z-RO i hate u

X.O. feat CEECEE grind baby

DAVID BANNER cadillac on 22’s 

YOUNGBLOODZ feat BIG BOI 85

UGK feat OUTKAST international player’s anthem

LIL’ WAYNE shooter 

LIL’ WAYNE feat BOBBY VALENTINO mrs officer

DEVIN THE DUDE feat SNOOP DOGG & ANDRE 3000 what a job

OUTKAST feat CEE-LO and BIG GIPP git up, git out

UGK in the mornin’